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Affiliated Training Center

Dive sites nearby

Alex Van Opstel (Wreck)

This wreck was a Belgian Passenger liner sunk by a mine on 15 Sept 1939. The depth is around 27m. Strong currents exist in the area so it must be dived during slack tide! The stern section broke off and is now located around 100m from the rest of the wreck.

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British Inventor (Wreck)

Fairly flat wreck, consisting of plates and other wreckage. Only the bow section of the ship sank, the rest was towed away and repaired. Depth is 17m on a mainly sand and gravel bottom.

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Elena R (Wreck)

Greek steamship sunk on 22nd November 1939. Lies at a depth of 27m and stands around 7m high in places. Surrounded by loose sandy gravel and strong currents. Be careful to get the right dive times.

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Bombarden Unit (Wreck)

This wreck sank in two sections, the second section is about 150 yards to the southeast. Large metal tanks and some flat sheets can be seen. It sits at 12m deep in a soft, silty bed with the wreck standing around 3m high.

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This is a paddle steamer built at the end of the 1800s. Towards the end of its life it was used as a barge to ferry coal out to the battleships moored within the harbour. In 1935 it was blown from its moorings and ended up wrecked against the breakwater wall where it remains.

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Spaniard/Encuri (Wreck)

Just inside the outer breakwater, this is another fantastic wreck for beginners, or those wanting somewhere to check out gear, test skills, or just head out for an ’easy’ dive. Max depth is 14m, going up to 7m.

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Balaclava Bay

Starting on a 6m ledge, this is a great site for drift dives. By swimming away from the shore, divers can choose their depth, though most of the interesting stuff is in the shallower region.

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Ethel (Wreck)

Ethel was a British steamship, torpedoed by German Sub-UB-104 on 16 September 1918, and was one of the last casualties of WWI. Depth is 36m on a sandy bed with good visibility.

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The Kyarra was a 6,953 ton steel cargo and passenger luxury liner, built in Scotland in 1903 for the Australian United Steam Navigation Company.Length: 127 m Launched: 2 February 1903, Draft: 9.576 m, Beam: 16 m, Builder: William Denny and Brothers Places built: Scotland, Dumbarton.

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This Submarine P-555 is lying upright on the seabed at 39m. This wreck is pretty much intact. It sank on 28 April 1947. With 4x21in bow torpedo tubes and a 3in AA gun, this is a great dive for any submarine enthusiast with a Deep or Extended Range Diver Speciality.

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