Diving the Pacific Islands

Chile is most famous for its long stretch of coastline set against the Andes Mountains and wild Patagonia landscape; however, Chile also owns some of the world’s most remote islands found in the Pacific Ocean. The most popular of these isolated Chilean island possessions are the Juan Fernández Islands and the Polynesian island of Rapa Nui, otherwise known as Easter Island. Set far out into the Pacific Ocean, these islands offer fantastic, pristine diving opportunities. The rich biodiversity experienced when diving in Chile’s Pacific islands directly reflects their isolation. You will have the chance to experience dive sites like nowhere else on earth. Visibility in these waters can reach up to 60 meters (200 feet) on a good day, thanks dry climates and lack of development. While diving on Easter Island, you can explore mysterious caves and photograph submerged Moai. On the most popular Juan Fernández Island, Robinson Crusoe, the density of fish will entrance you along with captivating deep blue drop-offs. Chile marine life encounters amongst these islands are also fantastic. With many whale species migrating through these waters, hearing whale songs while diving is not uncommon. Don’t miss out on some of the best diving in Chile on these remote, captivating Pacific islands.

Dive Sites to visit in Pacific Islands

Featured places to go in Pacific Islands

Easter Island

Scuba diving on the remote island of Rapa Nui, more popularly known as Easter Island, is an exciting adventure for divers of all levels.

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Juan Fernández Archipelago

If you are looking to go diving off the beaten track, this is the place! These islands are a hotspot for endemic species.

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Wildlife Encounters in Pacific Islands

Marine life within the waters surrounding Chile’s Pacific Islands is diverse. Diving in Chile amongst these isolated islands offers a unique experience with sea life found nowhere else on earth. These islands are a hotspot for endemic species, with Easter Island hosting 142 species only found in its waters and 62% of the reef fish in the Juan Fernández archipelago endemic to that area. The deep Pacific waters encircling these remote islands are also a spawning and breeding ground for many top ocean fish predators like tuna, swordfish, marlin, and sharks. Divers will also enjoy hearing migrating whale songs on many dives.