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Discover the world’s best diving in Oceania

Diving in the region known as Oceania offers some of the best, most pristine diving in the world. Oceania is made of thousands of islands throughout the Central and South Pacific Ocean and includes famous dive destinations such as Australia, French Polynesia, Micronesia, and Fiji. Thousands of divers travel to Oceania every year to immerse themselves in some of the most beautiful, remote dive sites on the planet. Oceania is the soft coral capital of the world, displaying every color imaginable and hosting thousands of fish species. Not only do macro lovers enjoy diving in Oceania, but those looking for the thrill of big marine life sightings like whale sharks, manta rays, and other sharks do as well. Plan your next dive vacation to Oceania and discover diving as you have never seen it before.

Yongala Wreck

SS Yongala Wreck - The boat is now an artificial reef with amazing marine life that are supersized compared to seeing them on the Great Barrier Reef. You cannot penetrate or touch the wreck as it is a grave site but this doesn’t take away from this amazing dive. Can have very strong currents.

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HMAS Brisbane (Wreck)

The HMAS Brisbane was scuttled in July 2005 to create an artificial reef off Mooloolaba’s Sunshine Coast. The Queensland government created a Conservation Park around the wreck. This wreck is buzzing with beautiful marine life.

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La Vallée blanche, Tahiti

One of the most beautiful dive of Tahiti for its fauna. Grey sharks, white tip, black tip, lemon and sometimes even the majestic tiger shark. The dive is particularly recommended for drift diving.

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Turtle Canyon

Turtle Canyon reef is one of the most popular dive sites on the island of Oahu due to the sheer number of sea turtles here. This reef is a turtle cleaning station and is fairly shallow, making it also a great snorkel site.

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Ti Point is a great beginners dive site! It is an easy site to access with a concrete ramp and wharf that can be used to enter and exit the water.

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Pufana

This site is located inside the lagoon, it is not very deep which is ideal for beginners or training dives. It is also the ideal place for photographers, who like brightness (white sand) and calm conditions (sheltered from the current).

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Blue Corner Palau

Blue Corner is considered the number 1 of Palau dive sites. Often strong currents, so a Reef hook is strongly recommended. Incredible fish and coral life. Best visibility on outgoing current. Adrenaline rush guaranteed!

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Goat Island is a marine reserve located near Cape Rodney in the Hauraki Gulf. The reserve offers a range of marine landscapes, from sandy flats to rocky reef systems.

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Discover the world’s most fascinating aquatic life

Aquatic life under our oceans, lakes, rivers, and streams is amazing! From microscopic zooplankton to the largest animal on earth, the blue whale, underwater life comes in all possible shapes and sizes. With 71% of the earth being covered with water, it is no wonder we are so fascinated with what lies beneath the surface. In fact, scientists estimate that there are nearly 1 million different species of aquatic animals. Freshwater ecosystems are home mainly to fish, invertebrates, and reptiles, whereas the ocean contains a wide array of marine life including fish, mollusks, crustaceans, reptiles, sharks, and marine mammals like whales, dolphins, seals, and manatees.

The common dolphin is one of the most historically popular dolphins recorded throughout art and literature. It is currently the common name for two species, the short- and long-beaked common dolphin, both of which can be found in tropical and warm-temperate parts of the ocean. The long-beaked variety is mostly found along coastal waters, whereas, the short-beaked is found in offshore waters most frequently found in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Both species, however, occur in the southern California Bight and sometimes aggregate by the thousands!

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The whale shark is not only the largest of all sharks, but also the biggest fish in the world. It can grow up to 20 meters long, weigh 34 tons, and live for over 100 years. Its back can appear gray, brown, or blue in color and is covered with bright white stripes and spots arranged in transverse lines.

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Reef Manta Ray

The reef manta ray is the second largest ray species in the world next to its close relative, the giant oceanic manta, growing up to 3.5 m (12 feet) wide, or more. In fact, these two types were considered a single species until 2009 when they were officially split into two distinct species. Reef mantas can be found in tropical and subtropical waters throughout the Indo-Pacific region. Unlike the deeper dwelling giant oceanic manta, they prefer shallower waters and are typically found cruising over coral reefs and other coastal habitats.

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Clownfish

Not the best swimmers, Clownfish seek shelter in their anemone homes throughout most of the day. These distinctly colorful fish have developed a highly intricate and mutually beneficial symbiotic relationship with their anemone homes, earning them the nickname: anemonefish. Due to this sophisticated relationship, they tend to stay within a maximum radius of four meters to their anemone host in order to hide quickly within its tentacles in case of danger. If you’re lucky enough dive with clownfish you could experience these cute little fish attempting to “attack“ you to defend their anemone.

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Despite their protruding teeth, menacing grin, and aggressive predatory status, barracuda are actually completely passive towards divers and snorkelers, although passing by a large adult can still be intimidating to the most experienced scuba diver. They are found in tropical and temperate oceans throughout the world, preferring to cruise over coral reefs, seagrass beds, and near the surface of the water, never venturing very deep; therefore, they are commonly sighted while scuba diving.

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Lionfish are native to Indo-Pacific waters and are usually found hiding under ledges or in shallow caves at depths between 2 and 60 meters. They are diurnal, meanings they hunt both during the day and at night but often stay hidden until sunset to avoid predators. Unfortunately, lionfish have become an invasive species in the western Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. In fact, despite their menacing beauty, lionfish have become a huge problem in the Caribbean as their population has spread tremendously in just a single decade. In fact, the Science Channel has claimed they are “one of the most aggressively invasive species on the planet.” These flashy predators are considered fairly aggressive and harmful to humans so take caution when diving with lionfish and keep a safe distance.

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The puffer fish is named after its ability to inflate itself like a ball in danger or stress. They pump water into a sac-like enlargement of their stomach, causing them to deform into a ball. This change in volume makes it almost impossible for predatory fish to swallow the puffer fish and it can even suffocate them. If this stress reaction is caused willfully by divers, puffer fish can sometimes inadvertently suck in breathing gas from divers, which leads to them being buoyant and floating helplessly on the surface. This usually ends fatally for the animal. They are rarely eaten by predatory fish, but dolphins have been observed to get intoxicated on these animals by chewing lightly on them, which causes the puffer fish to release small doses of the strong neurotoxin tetrodotoxin. This poison is fatal to humans and no antidote is known; ironically, however, in Japan puffer fish is considered a delicacy called fugu. However, people’s curiosity about this questionable delicacy leads to accidents every year.

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Who has never been overjoyed to see a turtle while snorkeling or diving? These friendly-looking, ancient reptiles are found worldwide in tropical and subtropical areas. Sea turtles can live for up to 100 years and are believed to have been living here on earth for millions of years. Many facts about them are astonishing but probably the most is the fact that female turtles return to the exact beach where they were born, a journey sometimes covering thousands of kilometers, to lay their eggs in shallow nests they dig in the sand with their flippers. This is an incredible achievement and an awe-inspiring thing to watch. Most locations where you can dive with sea turtles are also where you can sneak a peek at this miraculous egg-laying practice that’s as old as time itself.

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Check out incredible moments water enthusiasts like you experience every day with SSI

Did you just complete an SSI certification? Proudly post it! Want to support your favorite SSI Training Center and promote it to the world? Post it! Did you just have an unforgettable dive experience with your SSI Professional? Post it!

We love to see the SSI family growing day by day: so upload your photo to Instagram with #wearessi or #divessi or mention @ssi_international, and it will automatically appear in the SSI Hall of Fame. We can’t wait to see your adventures today!

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